LED Instructable using Engineering Graph Paper

September 19, 2010
Tags: , ,

This instructable “How to use an LED Array Module” uses a variation of the CircuitGizmo Engineering Graph Paper that has the pin-out for the ATmega644.

This version can be downloaded here:

http://www.circuitgizmos.com/files/enggraphmega644.pdf

This paper can be downloaded here:

http://www.circuitgizmos.com/files/projectpaper.pdf

=Gizmo=

Comments Off

CircuitGizmos Prototype Bench – Wire Rack

September 16, 2010
Tags: ,

Easy enough to make, this wire spool rack was made from two old shelves and some wood dowels. #22 stranded is used for many general-purpose prototypes. Ten colors:

Black
Red
White
Orange
Yellow
Violet
Green
Blue
Gray
Brown

500 foot or 1000 foot spools. The spools are a reasonable price and tend to last a long time when used for prototypes only and not production. Along the bottom of the bench (not pictured) are several yardsticks. The loose wire end can be pulled along the bench to cut the wire to length.

Make: Magazine has posted a simpler way to make a -smaller- wire rack here: http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/09/collins_lab_wire_rack_attack.html

=Gizmo=

Comments Off

Using Industrial Control System Concepts at Home

August 29, 2010

Here is a web site (http://www.1wireprojects.net) that uses the CGU4x1 USB devices to control home automation using 1-wire devices. The USB interfaces can communicate with 1-wire devices and forms the basis for home automation through some custom-made 1-wire interface modules.

Welcome to my 1-Wire Project web site. I created this site to discuss and help me organize my efforts in creating solutions with 1-Wire devices.

Comments Off

Computer control of AC devices

June 28, 2010

An Instructables published a week or so ago:

If you have ever wanted to control electronic devices from your computer to control or regulate your environment, this instructable will guide you. In this example of computer control, a USB relay device (USBmicro http://www.usbmicro.com – U451) will control two 60 watt light bulbs from a PC program.

Visit this instructable for more information.

Comments Off

Updated USBmicro information

April 30, 2010

The On-line Development Notebook (ODN) at USBmicro has been updated to include information on the U451 USB relay board, as well as the new commands for interfacing to 2-wire (I2C) devices. Visit USBmicro, or download the entire ODN in PDF format.

Comments Off

Engineering Project Graph Paper

December 15, 2009
Tags:

I have my way of taking notes. I’ve tried to find paper that would suit my needs. Notebook paper is a no-go. What? Just a bunch of lines? No. Regular green engineering paper comes pretty close, but I always end up modifying each and every page by hand.

So I broke down and made my own. With a color printer (I have a color laser) I can make my own faint blue graph paper. I can print them as I need them.

My Project Paper has small boxes to fill in for Project name, for the Title of the page (where you can put a specific label for that page), a box for the Date, as well as boxes for tracking this page among many. On the bottom is a box for the Engineer Signature and for a Witness Signature.

The graph paper part of this Project Paper is used like other engineering paper – for notes, charts, drawings, schematics, etc.

The Project Paper also incorporates a to-do list. A to-do item can be noted alongside one of the boxes on the left side of the page. Listed along the left edge is the marking system that I use. A blank box, perhaps obviously, is a to-do that is not done. A check mark in the box is a done item. An “X” in the box is a to-do item that has been canceled – it doesn’t need to be done. A “+” in the box indicates that the task noted on this page has been moved to another later page.

As a little bonus the right side of the page can be used as a ruler.

projectpaper

Here is the Project Paper as a PDF file: Project Paper

Happy documenting. :-P

=Gizmo=

Comments Off

SoR Kit assembly, Part 3

December 5, 2009

The 6-pin programming header.

SoR Kit assembly, Part 1
SoR Kit assembly, Part 2

If you have purchased the SORKIT1 here at CircuitGizmos, or even if you purchased the parts somewhere else, you might be interested in the Gizmo build of the circuit board controller. The Society of Robots instructions here have a handful of steps for building the $50 robot. Steps 3A, 3B, and 3C have to do with making the electronics of the robot. Step 3B specifically is the step that has to deal with building the controller board. The Society of Robots step 3B also shows board assembly if you have a 10-pin AVR programmer, where here in this blog the 6-pin programmer is used.This blog entry will highlight steps that will help make your controller assembly a little more likely to succeed.

This blog entry is where the controller board being built has part placement different from the board in step 3B of the SoR documentation. This board uses the 6-pin programming header.

Old programming header:

10pin

Stole this pic from the SoR website. It shows the old(er) 10 pin header.

New programming header:

6pin

Stole this pic from the SoR website, too. It shows the 6 pin header.

(more…)

Comments Off

SoR Kit assembly, Part 2

December 5, 2009

Assembling parts onto the SORKIT1 controller board.

SoR Kit assembly, Part 1
SoR Kit assembly, Part 3

If you have purchased the SORKIT1 here at CircuitGizmos, or even if you purchased the parts somewhere else, you might be interested in the Gizmo build of the circuit board controller. The Society of Robots instructions here have a handful of steps for building the $50 robot. Steps 3A, 3B, and 3C have to do with making the electronics of the robot. Step 3B specifically is the step that has to deal with building the controller board. The Society of Robots step 3B also shows board assembly if you have a 10-pin AVR programmer, where here in this blog the 6-pin programmer is used.This blog entry will highlight steps that will help make your controller assembly a little more likely to succeed.

You should also read the step 3B documentation on the SoR website along with these instructions.

Mounting the DIP socket:

sorkit10

(more…)

Comments Off

SoR Kit assembly, Part 1

December 5, 2009

If you have purchased the SORKIT1 here at CircuitGizmos, or even if you purchased the parts somewhere else, you might be interested in the Gizmo build of the circuit board controller. The Society of Robots instructions here have a handful of steps for building the $50 robot. Steps 3A, 3B, and 3C have to do with making the electronics of the robot. Step 3B specifically is the step that has to deal with building the controller board. The Society of Robots step 3B also shows board assembly if you have a 10-pin AVR programmer, where here in this blog the 6-pin programmer is used.This blog entry will highlight steps that will help make your controller assembly a little more likely to succeed.

SoR Kit assembly, Part 2
SoR Kit assembly, Part 3

The SORKIT1 Controller Board:

sorkit00

The picture above shows the finished SORKIT1 board. You might note a few differences from the board built in step 3B on the SoR website. First, the AVR programming header is the newer 2 by 3 pin type, rather than the older 2 by 5 pin type. The newer 6 pin programming connection is now more common. The 10 pin programming connection can still be found on older programmers.

Second you might notice that the placement of the regulator and the power connections are different than the connections on the SoR board in step 3B. I made changes in the part placement, but the functionality remains unchanged.

(more…)

1

Serial port AVR programmer

December 3, 2009
Tags: ,

I’m still testing the newest USBmicro firmware. Meanwhile I thought I would document a little serial port to AVR programmer I made. The design is from a schematic on the Internet. Obviously the design was by Olimex. Note that the simple programmers of this type only work with a laptop or PC with a “real” serial port – a USB-to-serial does not work.

This is the schematic. Ignore the 10-pin header on the right. You will want to replace it with the 6 pin header.

sch

This is the top of the board:

serprog1

(more…)

Comments Off